• Your Mouth Is A Deciding Factor For The Suuitability Of An Instrument

    Comments Off on Your Mouth Is A Deciding Factor For The Suuitability Of An Instrument
    February 7, 2017 /  Composer & Instrument
    images5

    Before your child starts playing a kind of musical instrument, particularly a wind instrument such as a clarinet or saxophone, a New York orthodontist strongly recommends that you check first with your dentist.

    According to this orthodontist, there is a connection between individual’s dental problems and the kind of musical instruments that they play.

    In one issue of the Journal of the American Dental Association, he argues that American children by the millions are merely playing instruments randomly assigned to them in their music classes in schools.

    Thousands of children are not meant to play certain instruments because of dental or temperamental reasons.

    As a result, musicians would end up being handicapped from the start and only play the instrument with average skill.

    A good dentist should be able to tell patients involved in playing of musical instruments how certain wind instruments may be the root cause of certain dental problems.

    Before pursuing a musical instrument, it is advised that children and parents first seek advice from a dentist.

    Dental specialists point fingers at reed instruments as being responsible for a lot of cases involving body tissue illnesses experienced by wind instrumentalists.

    This is because a lot of the instrument’s weight is put upon the lower lip which is supported by the teeth.

    If you continue to put too much weight on the teeth, you could lessen the amount of blood that is needed to flow into the affected bone area.

    The lower jaw muscles might also have a tendency to create outward pressure against some of the upper teeth, causing a misalignment of the teeth.

    Your teeth are pressed upon by the lips if you play a brass instrument like a trumpet or trombone. There may be movement of the teeth that shouldn’t exist if these instruments are played always for long periods.

    The oboe or bassoon is not a recommended instrument for one with irregular front teeth because he could suffer lip pain, nor is the flute recommended with a person who has a short upper lip.

    Some string instruments also have strong potential for dental problems. He says that previously done studies point to continuous violin playing as a cause of faulty bite since a lot of pressure is applied to the jaw as it holds the violin against the shoulder.

    Dental problems may be avoided if the would be musician would have an oral examination, especially of his tongue and lips. He says that when recommendations are given and given early, then musicians would not have much problems playing the musical instrument they desire to play.

    Starting your dental checkups very early is never a disadvantange, in fact you should so you don’t end up with problems later on.

    Seeing your dentist before going and playing a musical instrument that needs the mouth to operate is a must. Any other activity or recreation that makes use of the mouth should be a sign for you to see your dentist first.

    Related Posts

    Posted by therubberband @ 10:36 am

Comments are closed.